I remember seeing Run Lola Run directed by Tom Tykwer back in 1998 and saying to myself “Vat are Ze German’s up to now!?” The film attacked all my geek weaknesses the first being that cute fire engine redhead Franke Potente. Then came the animated sequences and last, but most certainly not least the music. Every throbbing drum beat was masterfully edited to drive an already chaotic and out of control storyline in to insanity. Tom Tykwer is that master, following in the footsteps of great directors like John Carpenter, Clint Eastwood and RZA, he’s a director who’s ego, not unlike mine, will not allow him to have his filmed marred by a composer who doesn’t share the same vision right down to the last frame. Control…control…control, but also a lot of hard work, I guess that’s why he enlist the help of two equally talented partners in crime Johnny Klimek ( Killer Elite, The International) and Reinhold Heil (The Cave,Land Of The Dead). Johnny Klimek is an Australian film and television composer, currently based in Los Angeles. In the 80’s he formed The Other One’s a new wave-ish group whose song Holiday hit #29 on October 17, 1987 going on later to become known for his electronica work in the band System 101. Not long after he teamed up with Tykwer the two of them wrote the score for Run Lola Run. Reinhold Heil is also no stranger to 80’s music, he too was in a band called Spliff (Yeah…that’s right) and the Nina Hagen Band. They didn’t rise to the heights as The Other One’s, but that didn’t stop him from continuing to pursue a career in music. Later he composed for television shows like Without A Trace and also produced pop acts like Kim Wilde. Right now the three are hard at work wrapping up the arrangements they did for the new Wachowski film Cloud Atlas co directed by Tykwer. The story is an epic work of science fiction that spans thousands of years. Based on a novel by David Mitchell it’s about SPOILERS :The novel consists of six nested stories that take the reader from the remote South Pacific in the nineteenth century to a distant, post-apocalyptic future. Each tale is revealed to be a story that is read (or observed) by the main character in the next. All stories but the last are interrupted at some moment, and after the sixth story concludes at the center of the book, the novel “goes back” in time, “closing” each story as the book progresses in terms of pages but regresses in terms of the historical period in which the action takes place. Eventually, readers end where they started, with Adam Ewing in the Pacific Ocean, circa 1850.

Sounds interesting, maybe a little confusing, but I’ve trusted the Wachowski’s in the past and they have never let me down before. Below I’ve posted some of Tom, Johnny’s and Reinhold’s past endeavors. I hope you will check them out and don’t forget to watch Cloud Atlas coming out October 26, 2012.






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