Fan favorite contest winners, Balthazar Auxietre and Sylvain Derosne, are the directors of M83’s new video release of the single, ‘Steve McQueen’.  This single is the latest off the album, Hurry Up We’re Dreaming.   The song is apparently not about the actor, or, that is what the hopefuls in the contest were told was their only stipulation on the projects design.  The contest was held by M83 in partnership with Genero.tvThe feel and texture of the video work great with the M83 vibe and very similar to other productions of M83 tracks.  Stop motion animated toy animals dancing along a trail of pulp science magazines toward dry land as some banana suit kid dances in the rain while playing with electricity?  Sure.

I keep waiting for that kid to learn a lesson.

More M83?  This is the video for the track ‘Midnight City’ directed by Fleur & Manu.  Apparently influenced by AkiraVillage of the Damned and Close Encounters of the Third Kind.


‘Reunion’ is the follow-up video of ‘Midnight City’.  More glowing eyed childrens.

Dylan Terra did a great review on Hurry Up We’re Dreaming about a year ago on Heavy.com.  After reading it, I found I was unable to really do a better job at expressing the way I feel about the album.
For the past decade, French dream-pop master Anthony Gonzalez has imagined, retreated, and soared with music. His atmospheric prowess, compositional ambition, and romanticized nostalgia fixation have generated a now signature sound—often imitated, never quite matched. Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming, his sixth album, adds serious depth to the Hughes-esq melodrama of his 2008 release Saturdays=Youth, letting it stretch out in more expansive, cinematic soundscapes that marked his earlier work—it’s a dangerously effective culmination. Lead single “Midnight City” quickly reminded everyone that M83 songs are grand and beautiful and, take or leave it, boundless. One spin of the Zola Jesus featuring “Intro” will tell you this isn’t some walk in the buzzband park; it’s a launch far away from the planet, an ode to imaginations, maxed on drum-sent crescendos and heaven-met shouts. Depending on the threshold of its listener, a double disc’s worth of that over-the-top sensation, where instrumental transitions suggest scenes like “Train to Pluton” (and then there’s extra epic “My Tears Are Becoming A Sea”), might overwhelm. But that seems to be the point.
Thanks for being there.  @HugoSchoen  @MITNG2442

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