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During my stay in New York I was fortunate enough to have gotten the chance to see Takashi Murakami‘s work at the Brooklyn Museum. I even ran into the Super Size guy Morgan Spurlock…whaaaa? Anyway, I can’t began to describe the feelings you get from looking at TM’s stuff, his work is Japan on acid. Erotic, visceral and fun, but that was kinda then and this is now. Takashi has taken a slight departure from fountains of sperm and poop to focus on something more serious like the effect the 2011 Tsunami inTakashi Murakami Private Preview And Dinner At Blum & Poe, Los Angeles Japan had on him. In this latest episode by The Creators Project he’s seems to have morphed that experience into his feelings on Japan as a whole and how that relates to his relationship with the U.S. or Western culture. It’s a real interesting video that sheds some light on the often times misunderstood phenomenon, that is his work. I’d often heard from my fellow Japanese friends that in Japan Takashi doesn’t receive nearly as much press as we give him in the states and that could be because they think his work is trite, but in my opinion there’s no denying the mastery involved in some of his more complex pieces. One could understand, with that level of animosity that one could become bitter about his home, a home which he explains has essentially lost it’s identity. I don’t necessarily agree with that assessment, I think Japan is rich beyond comprehension with history and identity, but what’s happen to TM is what happens to most who become easily bored a.k.a Artist, for the most part. You become fascinated by other things and I don’t think there’s anything wrong with that, you just can’t get to a point where you believe there’s no level of magic to be had at home and I think the recent disaster in Japan brought that realization home for him. I’m getting deep aren’t I? Sorry. Enjoy the video.

The Creators Project
Takashi Murakami
Brooklyn Museum

 

 

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