The new single from the rising American rock band, Mona, is setting the stage for the rest of their new album. Titled Torches & Pitchforks, it’s expected to drop July 23rd. While the single, “Goons (Baby All I Need)” is quite generic and radio friendly, it’s the music video that stands out. The song plays out like a more dynamic “Gold On The Ceiling” by Black Keys, so expect to hear this track on every sports commercial possible.

The video opens with a vintage letterhead of the band’s name, followed by a statement that talks about how the US government tried to crack down on rock & roll in the 50’s to reduce youth crime. After, there’s a scene that shows a quote by Frank Sinatra trashing rock & roll, calling it fake and primal. Now if there’s a textbook way of hooking the audience, it’s this. The opening itself completes the music video, showing off the fact that “We won the war”. It’s an interesting concept that’s portrayed by the rest of the video.

Now following this great opener, we’re graced with watching a mixture of modern day house partying and vintage 50’s style. There’s no ground broken here, and if it wasn’t for the great opener this video would actually be quite bland. What completes this entire video is the story behind it. The band slaps everybody’s negative opinion of rock & roll in the 50’s by using the same instruments, same clothes, and same hairstyles as the past generation’s bad-asses used and threw them into a contemporary scene of good-looking people. Greasers lived on and crooners died with jazz, that’s the entire message of this video. While not exactly accurate, it’s a good portrayal of how the times have changed, and we’ve become more accepting of what’s shown in pop culture.

While Mona doesn’t create anything special and influential here, they do create a scene of how we’ve changed for the greater good. More accepting and open to the arts and freedom of speech. The video showcases a classic party and how no matter who we are, we know what a good time is. Generally speaking, the rules haven’t changed from generation to generation, and Mona provides the examples here.

Catch the video here:

Advertisements